Poll: Should WASP 101 Return?

Richard - WASP 101

It’s been a couple of weeks since WASP 101 was taken down.  I wasn’t a regular reader of that blog, and I would never have taken advice, sartorial or otherwise, from Richard.  His peculiar style made him the whipping boy of preppy/Ivy/trad bloggers and those who follow them.  My visits to WASP 101 were almost always prompted by commentary on other sites about Richard’s pretentions or particularly bad clothing combinations.

In the spirit of freedom of expression, I ask you:  Should WASP 101 return?  I have a feeling that your answer may depend upon how much you like being at the circus.  While it can be fun for some, others will feel uneasy, especially around clowns.  The potential for chaos lurks in the background.  If you accept the risk, you might be entertained…but you might just as easily find yourself running for the exit.  Choose wisely.

Clown

TAKE THE POLL

Andy Warhol: Button Down Man

Andy Beside Woody

Andy Warhol, the son of Polish immigrants, left his hometown of Pittsburgh and arrived in New York City by train in June 1949 with $200 dollars in his pocket. He had just graduated from the art program at Carnegie Mellon and wanted to work as a commercial illustrator for a magazine publisher.  But he was also obsessed with becoming famous.  He really wanted to be a fine artist, but wasn’t sure how to make a living at it.  In fact, he was unsure whether that was even was possible.

Andy - 1949

Warhol’s first job was working for Glamour Magazine, which was one of the Conde Nast publications.  He was hired by the art director there, Tina Fredericks, to do illustrations for a story called, “Success is a Job in New York.”  Fredericks wrote of her first meeting with this curious looking person in tortoise shell glasses,

“I greeted a boy with a big beige blotch on his cheek, possibly going all the way up to his forehead.  He was all one color.  Weird.  There seemed to be something other earthly or offbeat, different, for sure.  Elfish.  From another world.  He had a breathy way of talking.  His voice was slight, unemphatic, whispery, covered over with a smile.”

As a child, Warhol had suffered St. Vitus Dance, a neurological disorder that left his skin permanently discolored.  He would remain highly self-conscious his entire life about his physical appearance, famously choosing to wear an outlandish gray wig when confronted with thinning hair.

Warhol - Tortoise Shell During the 1950s, Warhol became one of the most sought after and well-paid illustrators in Manhattan.  His increasing income allowed him to move into his own townhouse.  He began to shop for his clothes at Brooks Brothers.  For the remainder of his career could be seen, even during the psychedelic days of The Factory in the 60s, wearing a Brooks Brothers suit and button down – sometimes with a repp tie.  He apparently ceased wearing bow ties after the 50s.

Andy Warhol with Rod

Unsatisfied with his commercial success, Warhol longed for something more.  He wanted to get exhibitions in important galleries.  Presenting his portfolio of drawings, he was rejected time after time – partly because his work was representational in an artworld dominated by abstraction, and partly because of his homoerotic themes, which were taboo back then.

tumblr_mi2l07m5yE1rf1jvro1_1280  By 1956, the only venues willing to show Warhol’s work were Serendipity, a popular ice cream parlor on the Upper East Side that was also a meeting place for gay men, and the Bodley Gallery next-door.  He did not sell a single drawing.  Two years later, artists Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg, breaking with the dominant mode of Abstract Expressionism, laid the foundation for Pop Art with their sensational one-man shows at Leo Castelli Gallery.

Warhol and Friends

Warhol’s work was maturing, moving toward a critique of consumer culture and mass production (best represented by his Campbell’s Soup series) in which all traces of the artist’s hand – brush work, dripped paint or process – were eliminated.  In November 1962, his one-man show at Stable Gallery in New York City took the artworld by storm and established him as the leading figure of contemporary art.  It was instant celebrity.  Warhol was on the way to becoming a superstar, one of the most important artists of the 20th Century.

Warhol - Button Down & Skull

Warhol - Campbell's-Soup

Andy Warhol - White Button Down